1977 Coleman Concord Roof Rebuild

Discussion in 'Roof/Floor Repair & Maintenance' started by Lucy FJ55, Jul 22, 2016.

  1. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

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    Sep 9, 2011
    edh- Thanks again for your response and advice! Decided to use Eternabond tape on all seals, and will then roll Grizzley Grip over it all.





    I basically finished the roof sandwich. I am now waiting for adhesive to cure before I finish primer/paint on the ceiling. Then I'll be able to flip the roof and repair the hail damage and waterproof it.

    There is only one significant change I made to my Roof Sandwich rebuild. I added the correction in red below...


    "Roof Sandwich

    I will reuse the aluminum roof skin. Plan to semi flatten/pound the worst of the dents, Gold bondo the rest. I'll use LocTite PL Premium to re-adhere the roof skin within the existing aluminum frame. I'll use 3/4 " R-Tech or Foamular insulation (whatever they have in stock) for the next layer. I'll be adding four cross-roof braces, using 1"x3" wood glued to the aluminum roof skin also using LocTite PL Premium. These braces will notch into the roof frame and not only provide additional support, but also will help keep all layers tight within the roof frame.

    I'll cut foam to fit around the new wood framing/supports. I will place wood supports where the screen door hardware should be on the ceiling. Not sure if I'll ever use the ceiling to store the screen door, need to source the parts and figure out how that all works first. Figure I'd prepare for it and add a couple more supports to the other end of the roof too. Total roof weight will only be slightly heavier then the original with additional braces and bed liner.

    Plan to use FRP panels for the ceiling. Think I'll use Titebond FastGrab mastic to adhere FRP panels to the foam. I plan to add electrical for one or two lights as well.

    Instead, I used 5mm (about 3/16") Revolution Plywood. Thinner than 1/4" plywood, thicker than the original 1/8" paneling, but I was still able to squeeze it into the original roof frame. I used Loctite PL Premium for this step as well." [:D]


    Soooo, originally I planned to use FRP panels for the finished ceiling. Figured it would be water/rot/mildew resistant, and also a clean wipeable white finish I wouldn't have to paint or maintain much. However, after some research here on PUP and elsewhere, I determined FRP may not be the best choice for my project. I then went to the local box stores and picked up a thin, white plastic sheet material. Figured it would be light and hoped it would adhere better to the ceiling.

    What I thought of using...

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    What I ended up using...

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    The Revolution Ply worked real well. Still light, but will provide needed structure/rigidity.
     
  2. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

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    Sep 9, 2011
    I began rebuilding the roof sandwich by replacing the wiring for the light I plan to mount in the ceiling. The old wiring was suspect, so I decided to replace it. I noticed the hole the wire was originally thread through was rough and had plenty of burrs. Sanded it and tossed a rubber grommet in to protect the wires...


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    I cut and dry-fitted all the ceiling pieces (foam, wood bracing, plywood, wiring) prior to actual assembly. I wanted to be sure there would be no surprises during assembly. I was also concerned about the Revolution ply thickness and how challenging it may be to squeeze the roof sandwich into the roof frame.

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    I should again mention that it was a tight squeeze using Revolution ply which was about 3/16" thick vs. the original material which was about 1/8" thick. Doesn't seem like much but it mattered. Also, I struggled with how to install the ply without tearing the roof frame apart. There are tight tolerances in the frame for each layer of the roof sandwich and overlapping seams the ply needed to squeeze/fit under.

    Originally I planned to have one seam in the ceiling only, and I had already cut the ply to fit. Then I realized it would be a PITA to try to fit the thicker Revolution ply into the roof frame. Hemmed and hawed. I finally decided to cut up the roof pieces to make assembly easier. Because I had already cut my ply to fit, I ended up having to use four pieces for the ceiling making three seams. In hindsight, I should have realized the install would be a PITA and three-pieced the ceiling together to have only two seams. Either way, it all looks good now and should last awhile. [:D]
     
  3. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

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    11
    Sep 9, 2011
    Just before assembly I sanded, primed, and painted the exposed ceiling edges. They were rough and needed some love.

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    Then I began glueing (used LocTite PL Premium caulk) the foam and framing into place...

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    I let it all sit for a couple hours, then I finished the roof sandwich by glueing (again used LocTite PL Premium caulk) Revolution ply down next.

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    Finished pics coming soon!
     
  4. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

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    11
    Sep 9, 2011
    While the roof sandwiched cured, I sanded, primed, and painted some of the other bits and pieces...

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  5. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

    200
    11
    Sep 9, 2011
    I forgot to mention before that I primed the edges of the ply before installation and I also used 3/4" narrow crown staples (in addition to caulk) to attach the Revolution ply to the new wood bracing beneath.




    Next, I pulled off all the 'weights' from the roof sandwich and most everything looked good. I installed the freshly painted bits with all new hardware.

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    In a couple spots, the two edges of ply were not completely flat. I took the time to lay down some more caulk, added a few staples, and installed the trim. That being done, I added weights again for good measure. Once it all set, I then primed and painted the entire ceiling.

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    This last pic is of the one stubborn spot that I had to futz with a few times. Finally looks good and is all primed and painted, but we'll see how long it all lasts. [LOL]

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  6. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

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    Sep 9, 2011
    ... and I guess I forgot to take a finished ceiling pic, that will have to wait. [LOL]




    I was on a roll, so as soon as I could I flipped the roof with the help of a friend and continued to rebuild the other side. But first, I still had layers of caulk to remove. Ugh.

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    After hours of scraping, rubbing, scrubbing with acetone, etc. I was finally at a point I called 'done'. Then I sanded and washed the aluminum skin with TSP in prep for the next step... BONDO! [:D]
     
  7. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

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    11
    Sep 9, 2011
    I had never worked with Bondo before. It was fun at first, then it got rather old. There were a lot of dents...

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    Thought for sure I would have plenty of Bondo leftover after smoothing out the worst of the hail dents. However, I finished the can and had to run out and buy another. I used two cans (or 2 lbs.) of Bondo and probably could have used more... [:O]

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    It looks much better. I'm waiting on my Grizzly Grip bed liner to arrive in the mail for the top. In the meantime, I figured I'd spruce up the rest of the roof frame too...
     
  8. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

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    11
    Sep 9, 2011
    Caulked center and perimeter seams with Geocel Pro Flex (same as on corner caps). Cleaned up the roof frame one last time, then masked, primed and painted it.

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    Bad light, but again, the results were worth the effort...

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  9. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

    200
    11
    Sep 9, 2011
    WOOOOT! Finished the roof! [:D]


    Sanded one last time, then cleaned and primed the top.

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    Cleaned it again, then rolled on two coats of Grizzly Grip bed liner.

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    Gonna let it dry for a couple days, then I'll install it...
     
  10. lorelei510

    lorelei510 New Member

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    Jul 16, 2016
    I just started ripping apart the roof on my 82 Coleman Sun Valley. The luan sides clearly had water damage likely from the leaking corner pieces and there's mold on the foam sides. The top roof foam portion actually looks pretty good and undamaged except for one section that appears to have some mold on the surface. Not sure if it's leaking from the out top center seam down onto the top or if it was moisture from within the trailer that built up between the layers. I'm stuck trying to figure out my best approach moving forward.

    I'm trying to decide if I should I just gut the entire thing and build entirely new sandwich layers or should I just keep the top foam in place and replace the side foam pieces and new paneling all around? It appears to me that the center seam that runs along the top has not leaked but I'm not sure.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

    200
    11
    Sep 9, 2011

    Hmmmm, that's a tough one. At the point you're at, I'd probably rebuild the entire roof. This was a couple years ago already... what did you decide or end up doing?!
     
  12. Joe Brokenbourgh

    Joe Brokenbourgh New Member

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    Jul 24, 2018
    United States, Oregon
    I'm getting ready to do the roof on my 79' Coleman, I had a couple questions. Did the Geocel Pro Flex on the center and outer seam hold up? I was almost thinking about something more drastic like panel bonding adhesive. It's spendy, like $20 for 50ml. I've been reading how notorious these roofs are for leaking. Not sure if that was caused buy inferior materials when the made these or just time.
     
  13. Lucy FJ55

    Lucy FJ55 Member

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    11
    Sep 9, 2011

    I am certainly no expert, but from my experience Geocel Pro Flex has been holding up well. This pup has been through some nasty weather since the rebuild and I haven't seen any signs of wear or failure, and certainly haven't had any leaks yet. There may be better products out there to use for this application, but this product was recommend by others here on the forum and has worked well for me. Let us know what you end up using.
     

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