BEARS

Discussion in 'Camping Around Wildlife' started by travelerd, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. travelerd

    travelerd New Member

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    Jul 4, 2012
    Note to self and other campers: It is important to put all food stuffs in vehicles when camping where animals are prevalent. It is apparently also important to LOCK YOUR DOORS, as the young bears in Old Forge NY know how to open car doors. I woke up to three of my 4 doors open, and chips and cookie crumbs along with muddy bear foot prints all over my upholstry. I bought a kitchen magnet of a bear to put in camper as a reminder to always lock doors. Camp and learn.
     
  2. Hawks

    Hawks Member

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    Jun 26, 2012
    Wow, good to know. We're camping in bear country next week for the first time.

    Glad no damage was done to your car while they were having their snack!
     
  3. JamesRL

    JamesRL New Member

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    Nov 1, 2007
    Brampton, Ontario
    Where are you going Hawks? There are some campgrounds in Ontario worse than others for bears, though you should alwys be careful. Racoons are more often the threat.
     
  4. CamL48

    CamL48 New Member

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    Feb 20, 2012
    I read somewhere their periods attract bears. Bears can smell the menstruation.
     
  5. Hawks

    Hawks Member

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    Jun 26, 2012
    Hey James, we're going to Killbear. I understand that I have to keep all food out of the trailer and keep it hidden in the TV at this park. Just got back from the Pinery, where I saw Racoons, but none came through our site (we have a Coonhound dog, hoping she can keep away the coons!).
     
  6. Wildwoodflower77

    Wildwoodflower77 Member

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    Jun 10, 2012
    Only Polar Bears and the rare Grizzly. Black Bears have never been known to be attracted.
     
  7. CREEPPINGCHARLIE

    CREEPPINGCHARLIE CAMPING RECHARGES THE HUMAN MIND

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    Nov 14, 2007
    It never hurts to keep your vehicle locked so that the 2 legged bears stay out of the vehicle. They have a tendency to come around when campers are sleeping. [8D]
     
  8. Travelhoveler

    Travelhoveler New Member

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    Mar 8, 2011
    A door lock won't keep a bear out of a vehicle. They can easily pull a door apart at the frame or window. If they see food in a car or smell it, they can get to it. And not just food but cosmetics, medications, etc. Use a bear box if there is one at the campsite. Otherwise, hide food and coolers out of sight in trunks or under blankets and hope for the best.
     
  9. CamL48

    CamL48 New Member

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    Feb 20, 2012
    I was joking ... for the Anchorman fans out there.
     
  10. JamesRL

    JamesRL New Member

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    Nov 1, 2007
    Brampton, Ontario
    Travelhoveler,

    We don't have bear boxes in Ontario, at least that I have seen. Most places have bear proof garbage containers, but nothing on individual sites. So we store things in vehicles, out of sight as much as possible.

    Hawks,

    Have not been there personally, but friends have, and there are bear issues there periodically.
     
  11. gixer

    gixer New Member

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    Mar 21, 2011
    We had a huge metl dumpster turned over one night in upstate NY because the bears were looking threw it.
    6 guys could not flip it back they had to winch it. Crazy that the bears could do it. That made the wife fell all warm and fuzzy in the pup for the night.
     
  12. Travelhoveler

    Travelhoveler New Member

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    Mar 8, 2011
    That's true in many places in bear country. As I noted, if there are no boxes provided, store your food, cosmetics and medical stuff in a vehicle, hopefully the trunk, or at least out of sight under blankets, etc. and hope for the best. Vehicles aren't often bothered, but a bear can do great damage to it if it decides to break in.
     
  13. Wildwoodflower77

    Wildwoodflower77 Member

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    Jun 10, 2012
    Ha! That totally went over my head. I forgot all about that. [LOL]
     
  14. Kutseena

    Kutseena Running with the wolves

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    Nov 14, 2010
    [SUN] Growing up we were taught to suspend food and garbage on a rope between two trees; high enough off the ground that a bear standing on two legs couldn't reach it. I remember before digital cameras that we use to place our film in bear bags above the ground as well. Remember, bears are very intelligent, quick learners who are opportunistic when it comes to food. You have to try to out think them. Good luck.
     
  15. pasobuff

    pasobuff Member

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    Aug 6, 2012
    Upstate NY
    I have to chuckle...as we travel to Old Forge every September (but stay at the Forge Motel!).....the deer are also good at finding food, have to watch for them all over town.

    Oh...and makes me want to leave a note to self - remember to borrow one of Mom's Karelian Bear Dogs before camping up that way!!!
     
  16. zuley

    zuley New Member

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    Jun 7, 2008
    Just returned a week ago from three weeks at Killbear. The bears are an issue this year. With the dry summer we had they do not have the berries to feed on and because of a fire ban at KB they are less intimidated to come onto the sites at night. They have become very bold. One particular evening two tents and a popup were left uninhabitable due to yogi's getting in. This was certainly he fault of the campers as they made food available to the bears. Another camper had the window of his Explorer broken by a bear. The wardens were unable to get the bear out and called in the OPP in the middle of the night. Luckily Yogi left the vehicle on his own before the police arrived. Another camper we talked to had a bear get into the back of his truck not once but twice by somehow opening the tailgate. From that point on he backed the truck up against a tree at night. We ourselves walk our site every evening prior to shutting down and put everything away that might interest a bear. Didn't much matter... woke one evening to a bear on his hind legs looking in the bunk end at my wife's head. I yelled and he wandered off, not before putting a small tear in our screen.
    We've camped at KB for years. A few years back we had a yearling come and sit down beside us one afternoon while we enjoyed happy hour. Yelled at him and he got up and sauntered off. Never have we encountered what we did this year though.
     
  17. JamesRL

    JamesRL New Member

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    Nov 1, 2007
    Brampton, Ontario
    One week at Bruce and one at Bon Echo, and not a single major wildlife sighting. My GF was dissapointed. It wasn't for lack of trying, we hiked and canoed all over. But after reading about Killbear's challenges this year, I'm not so sad. She screamed when a racoon tried to charge her in the middle of the night, I'm afraid if a bear looked in the bunk end, she would have left for a motel.

    I'm sure the cancellation of the spring bear hunt has something to do with it. We had a bear killed by police in Burlington this spring, which is a long ways from any wilderness.
     
  18. Unstable_Tripod

    Unstable_Tripod Well, there's your problem!

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    May 20, 2008
    Seattle, Washington
    These incidents highlight how important it is to take all possible precautions. NEVER leave any food or cooking equipment out when it is not actually being used. Police up the campsite to be sure no crumbs or food-tainted trash items are laying around. Wash the table surface to reduce odors. Empty trash before bed each night. Store all food (bins and coolers), cooking equipment, dishes and cosmetics/toiletries in a bear box or in a locked TV out of sight. Food should also be put in containers that reduce the chance of smells getting out. In my tent and canvas PUP days I doubled-bagged everything in zip-lock freezer bags and then put it in the cooler or food bin. The more desperate bears are for food the more persistent they will be in exploring campsites and the more diligent campers must be in trying to bear-proof their areas. This is not just for personal safety but for bear safety as well.
     
  19. desertlady

    desertlady Member

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    Sep 3, 2011
    wow, thanks for all the good information. I'm taking a trip to Yellowstone, then on to the midwest and I know I'll be in bear country. UT you gave a lot of helpful ways to stay say safe.
     
  20. RonB

    RonB New Member

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    Jun 8, 2011
    The NPS web site has information regarding animal precautions including bear rules. You will get similar information at the gate. Just do what they ask you to do and you'll be fine. It mostly boils down to keeping food out of your camper and locked up in your vehicle. There are some limited bear boxes available but don't count on them.

    Regarding fear, don't let that ruin your trip. We have spent more than 3 weeks in the park with the latest being a 6 night stop last fall. In that amount of time, we have seen exactly two bears (nose to tail) and that was during the mid 1980's. Yellowstone, and other parks, have done a good job of controlling them with their rules and regulations. Just to as they ask.

    BTW - Not to reignite any fear but they will probably tell you that the Bison is the most dangerous animal in the park. Not because they invade the campground, but because tourists are too stupid to respect them and give them space.
     

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