Extension Cable from House to Power PUP

Discussion in 'Power - Site Power/Batteries/Generators/Solar' started by AnotherHickey, Mar 12, 2019 at 9:52 AM.

  1. AnotherHickey

    AnotherHickey New Member

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    So we got the popup to do a lot of our camping in the woods in our yard. The neighbors have their campers on their side of the creek and I will have mine on my side with a bridge that connects the 2 sides. I want to be able to power up the PUP with an extension cord from the house. I believe it is about 150 feet from the corner of the house to the spot the camper will be parked. Are there any issues running an extension cable that far or is there a better way to get power to the PUP out in the woods. I would love to run the AC to cool it off before bed.
     
  2. BikeNFish

    BikeNFish Well-Known Member

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    I'm no electrician, but I would think that as long as you are plugged into an outlet that has a 20 amp circuit breaker and you use a 10 gauge cord, you should be ok to run AC. You might get by using a 12 gauge cord.
     
  3. mattlreese

    mattlreese Active Member

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    Voltage drop off a 150 ft extension cord could be a real issue. Here are some sample numbers based on a 15 amp draw.

    10 gauge 30 Amp RV extension cord (I am not sure these even exist at 150 ft)
    @15 amps = 5 Volt loss which is the maximum acceptable range. 15 amps will run the AC, but nothing else. You may run into issues if you run the AC & the Fridge.

    12 gauge standard 110v extension cord
    @15 amps = 7 Volt loss. This might be enough of a loss for the AC compressor to not kick on.
     
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  4. mattlreese

    mattlreese Active Member

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    Also you may not even be at 120V at that outdoor plug which could further complicate these figures. If its a long run from your breaker box to the outlet you will have some additional losses.

    Typically most electrical devices are rated to run within a 5% tolerance of 120V so its not an issue in your home. But when that AC compressor kicks on it draws a ton of electricity, combined with the extension cord losses you might have an issue.
     
  5. AnotherHickey

    AnotherHickey New Member

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    So it might be a "try it and see if it works" kind of thing. The outlet on the house is only 3 feet away from the breaker box inside the house, so that might be a good thing. I will try to get out there and measure the distance to make sure it isn't a longer run than 150 feet. Gotta get rid of some of this snow first though.

    If I didn't use the AC and just used the outlets and lights on the PUP it should still be ok though shouldn't it?
     
  6. mattlreese

    mattlreese Active Member

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    You should be ok for low current draw items. At low currents the losses will be minimal.
     
  7. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    I would use only the ac. Or everything else. So not together. Unless you hook up a second extension cord on a diffrent breaker. If you run too much the ac might burn out. Because the conderser will not cycle properly. Easy enough to plug the pup in, charge the battery, then run off battery power, and have the ac plugged in.
     
  8. NMroamer

    NMroamer Active Member

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    Do a search on line (voltage drop). WWW calculator.net will help you decide.
    my results were 115 volt using 10 gauge wire at 150 feet for a low current draw.
     
  9. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    If you have a 20 amp circuit to plug into you have to make sure there is nothing else on that circuit in the house/garage. You may need to test to see what else uses that circuit before plugging the camper in. Also if you have a 30 amp on the camper and you need to use an adapter make sure it is a heavy duty adapter. Those adapter can be a weak link as well. Just thought about it, but you will probably need to figure out a way to keep weather off of your plugs.
     
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  10. 1380ken

    1380ken Well-Known Member

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    It might be better to run an outlet to the camper. If you can dig a small trench to the camper, it would not be hard to install.
     
  11. AnotherHickey

    AnotherHickey New Member

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    The neighbor does have access to a trencher and I know there are no buried utilities in the woods down to the creek (there is a hill that I could run the line to so that it would never go under if the creek flooded). We will have to think about this.
     
  12. mattlreese

    mattlreese Active Member

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    If this is your plan you can use a higher gauge wire to lower the voltage drop. There are charts online that help with this but 8 AWG wire would keep the voltage drop under 5 V @ 25 amps which should be more then enough to run everything in the RV.
     
  13. brwarrior

    brwarrior Member

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    If I was going to go to the expense (time and fuel, even if the trencher is free) of trenching, just put in an actual 30 amp RV receptacle out there. You could run that with a #8/2 UF direct burial ($1.61/ft at the blue borg) and be less than 4% voltage drop for 30A. This is going to be an ugly link ... https://www.calculator.net/voltage-...ce=150&distanceunit=feet&amperes=24&x=33&y=14. Bury it with a min. of 24" cover. Put in a marking tape (caution tape) half the depth in the trench. You could always future proof it and go with a 125/250v/50A service out there as well. Drop in an RV pedestal with 20A/30A/50A receptacles and you'll be loving life.
     
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  14. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member

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    If running power underground, I put it in conduit, even if direct bury wire is used. Another layer of protection and easier to replace, if there is a failure. Both of my son's have shops that the power line failed because it was not in conduit. Previous owners had put the power supplies in. It just takes a rock or root to nick the insulation and water does the rest.
     
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  15. BikeNFish

    BikeNFish Well-Known Member

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    x2 on the conduit.
     
  16. 1380ken

    1380ken Well-Known Member

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    I don't think that you can put direct bury wire in conduit, it is against code, need to use single wires .I think the direct bury wire is good enough. I would run the line to the camper and have a few light posts on the path to the camper.
     
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