Gray water capacity?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Systems (The Fresh, The Blue, The Grey, &' started by Orchid, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

    What is the average size gray water tank in hybrids?
     
  2. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    It can vary. Those that are marketed as "lightweight" trailers may only have 10 gallon tanks. 20 gallons is probably a common size. But you have to watch carefully, they may have a 40 gallon fresh water tank and only 10 black and grey - meaning you have to empty before you need to fill.

    In addition, you have to know what drains are hooked up to which waste tank. My clipper's kitchen sink and shower go to the grey tank; the bathroom sink and toilet go to the black tank. By using my bathroom sink for all hand, face and teeth washing, I fill up the grey and black equally.
     
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  3. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    Tanks on our TT are 50gal. Fresh water.. 28gal black and 28gal grey..
     
  4. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

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    I don't have a hybrid, but do have 25ft TT. It holds 50 fresh, 30 black, and 35 grey.
     
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  5. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    I was looking at a tiny hybrid/TT under 3600 gvw and the tanks were only 23 gal gray and black and I think 30 fresh. So I think it depends on what size camper you are looking at. i was very limited by my weight so looked at the smallest hybrids. Ultimately I changed my mind about a hybrid when I really started looking at all the places I camp. Good thing too, my car would have been screaming at me if I towed a barn door like camper up the mountains. my popup is the same weight but I don't have to fight the wind drag I would with a hybrid.
     
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  6. GreyFox

    GreyFox Member

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    S Ontario
    Some won't agree but having owned a hybrid and a couple of travel trailers GW tank capacity doesn't really matter as it'll never be enough anyway, especially if you use the rig's shower. The key isn't tank capacity but having the ability to off load that grey water as necessary to keep the system functional. Many choose to use an unwieldy tote tank but I instead preferred 7 gal Aquatainers dedicated for the purpose as grey water can easily be off loaded by gravity and disposed of later at my convenience at the dump station.

    https://photos.google.com/share/AF1...?key=YTZrWHhLU0VrOWFnakV4el9jMXJodi1ISVItaGFR

    I'd be more concerned with black water tank capacity as some small trailers do really offer limited capacity - wise to look for something with a 25 to 30 gal BW tank so you can camp a week or two without having to give the BW tank any thought.
     
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  7. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    I agree to an extent, but it really depends on where and how you camp. I routinely camp at places where there aren't any dump stations nearby. So, the grey tank capacity is important. My clipper's tanks, in connection to my usage, are perfect - I run out of fresh water at the same time my grey and black water tanks are filled. For me that is the goal.
     
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  8. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

    That's the answer. The conclusion I came to about this whole question.

    I'm not concerned about the black water tank as I am the only one that uses it, and only at night. It easily lasts us 2 weeks. Even if it did fill up, with a cassette, it's super easy to pop out and take to the dump station. If the tank were built in, we would have to take the whole camper to the dump station, as there is no way I'm moving sewage to a tote tank. Looks like our pop up won out again.


    This kind of sounds like the discussion we had last week. We looked at a hybrid, a small one that weighed 400 lbs less than our pop-up. It didn't have the tank sizes listed, but had we gotten serious about it, I would have inquired.

    As you, ultimately, we decided to stay with our pop-up as long as possible. We have a socket genie, so set up and take down are not physically hard, and is now a quick process for us.

    Since I have recently started using our on board shower exclusively, I was looking for a better gray water solution. Actually, there aren't any. We would quickly fill up the on board tank and have to empty to our tow-able tote to take to the dump station. That is an extra step that would actually make things MORE complicated, not less.

    We also don't want to suffer less gas mileage with the drag. I need to just stop browsing camper ads, as we already have what we're looking for, in just about every way.
     
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  9. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    How are you handling the grey water now?
     
  10. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

    A 32 gallon tote that hooks to the hitch and tows to the dump station. It has to be dumped every couple of days with showers.
     
  11. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    California
    OK. When you're camping, you can keep the tank valve open and have it drain directly to the tote. Basically like you do now. The difference would be that if you fill the tote and can't get to the dump right away, you could still use the sink and shower as you have the onboard tank available to hold the water until the tote is emptied.

    And on the last day, you would be able to use the onboard tank and wait to drain until you get home (if you have a cleanout pipe or other access to the sewer/septic tank), saving you a trip to the dump.

    I pretty much never deal with dump stations. I wait til I get home and do it at my convenience.
     
  12. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    May 28, 2018
    California
    Not to say your system isn't efficient, just that an onboard tank can provide more options than the obvious.
     
  13. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

    Too much planning since you really need that grey water to rinse through after the black water.

    We always use the dump station, as it's fast and easy, and lightens the load. I've never encountered lines like I've heard people talk about here.

    Doable, but everything is a trade off. I'll just be happy with what we have for now. My be big decision was whether to spend $1k on a 20 year old camper or put it towards something different.
     
  14. GreyFox

    GreyFox Member

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    S Ontario
    A 32 gal wheeled tote is pretty big to store so an alternate solution is to instead use 7 gal Aquatainers which when full weigh 60 lbs. You in fact can couple 2 together just as I did back when our camper was a Fleetwood Santa Fe in which I had installed my own DIY shower.

    https://photos.google.com/share/AF1...?key=Y0tiYWFzQl8xdGRCRmwwOV90TXBtYlpOZHdRc3VB

    In my particular case I did install a separate drain for my DIY shower but this dual tank setup is even simpler if your Nevada drains both the sink and shower from the same drain outlet. Two Aquatainers offer a capacity of 14 gals so in your situation a daily run to the dump station when no one else is around and when you can also collect more fresh water would seem to be an obvious solution for you just as it has been for me for years. K.I.S.S. [:D]
     
  15. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

    That just wouldn't last us very long, I would be afraid of it overfilling all the time. The big wheeled one is no problem, it rides in the back of the van.

    Unfortunately, our shower and sink are not plumbed together. A project we will likely never do.
     

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