How much wheel heat is acceptable?

Discussion in 'Tires / Brakes / Bearings / Axles' started by jumpoff, Jul 11, 2018.

  1. jnc

    jnc Welcome from New Hampshire

    I was told many years ago that the wheel barring temp should never reach 140F if it does than you need to replace it.
     
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  2. jumpoff

    jumpoff I'm in a camping state of mind

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    I just ordered a digital thermometer from Amazon... (They have so many uses.) I'm going to test the heat build up again on Sat. to see if it's really a legitimate concern.

    If it's too hot there is a part of me that thinks it could be my brakes. I guess if I jacked up the wheel off the ground with the trailer brake controller connected and it had too much resistance to turning it would tell me if the brakes might be an issue?
     
  3. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

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    I aways figure about 30 degrees warmer than the outside temp or about the same asphalt pavement, which ever is warmer. They should be a little warmer than your TV tires.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
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  4. jumpoff

    jumpoff I'm in a camping state of mind

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    So my digital thermometer arrived. Thanks for suggesting that. I went for another shakeout cruise . I measured temps on my tires that were about 10 degrees different. One was about 125 the other about 135. I'm asking myself if this could be due to tire inflation.I have been using the air compressors at the local gas station. Their compressor won't inflate my tires above 54lbs and the tires will take up to 65lbs. How much of a factor do you think the 54lbs of pressure is in my tire temperature ?
     
  5. 1380ken

    1380ken Well-Known Member

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    Did you measure the temp of your TV tires?
     
  6. jumpoff

    jumpoff I'm in a camping state of mind

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    Yes I did and it was lower, but I can't remember how much.
     
  7. jumpoff

    jumpoff I'm in a camping state of mind

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    I also jacked up my trailer last night to see how freely the wheels spin. The wheel/tire that is heating up more doesn't spin quite as freely as the wheel that has the cooler temps. I will monitor the heat on our trip to see if it stays consistent. We are leaving this afternoon for our trip to Gatlinburg Tn. I have my digital thermometer in my driver door pocket. I will monitor it every time I stop.
     
  8. jnc

    jnc Welcome from New Hampshire

    If you go with the 140 I was taught That 135 axle needs help. If you dont have any wiggle in the wheel I would say it is a good time to repack them.
     
  9. joet

    joet Well-Known Member

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    I measured temps on my tires that were about 10 degrees different. One was about 125 the other about 135. I'm asking myself if this could be due to tire inflation.I have been using the air compressors at the local gas station. Their compressor won't inflate my tires above 54lbs and the tires will take up to 65lbs. How much of a factor do you think the 54lbs of pressure is in my tire temperature ?[/QUOTE]
    Running 10 lbs. low will make a difference. What was the hub temps?
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
  10. Lanternman

    Lanternman Active Member

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    What type of grease did you use, and how much preload on the bearings? These little buggers we pull around are notorious for blowouts and seized bearings if not maintained, so take zero chances with any of these items, get the best possible grease, bearings, tires, and inflate them to the max recommended cold pressure.
    My little 1100lb, 8ft Starcraft was 'overkilled' right after purchase- Load range D radials, synthetic hi-temp disc brake wheel bearing grease, and new Timken brand bearings. The synthetic should offer a little more temp buffer before breakdown, and 'disc brake/hi temp' is a must. When adjusting bearings, be sure to first tighten down good (50-60ft/lb) while rotating hub, then back off til its loose and take them to finger tight, plus a hair more- especially if you replaced the bearings, so they are seated correctly. Believe it or not, a hair snug is better than a hair loose. If those rollers arent preloaded a bit and start sliding instead of rolling, youre in trouble.
    Keep those tires at max, always!
     
  11. Jenn Moses

    Jenn Moses New Member

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    Brand new PUP owner, wondering if there is any good online tutorials you all know of about bearings? I don't know what they are, where to find them, or what repacking means :p ... but reading this thread, it's sounding important.
     
  12. jumpoff

    jumpoff I'm in a camping state of mind

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    Joet,

    Thanks for asking. I took my digital thermometer with me and used it alot on our trip to Gatlinburg last week. I got temperature readings on my one tire up to 145 degrees. That hub was about 114 for a high. The other tire was at a high of 135 degrees and the hub was about 105. Interestingly enough the pavement temperature was 137. The other thing I noticed on the way home in the late afternoon...the vehicle tires on the sunny side were all about 10 degrees warmer than the tires on the shady side. Next trip I'm pumping those tires to the max pressure of 65lbs.
     
  13. jumpoff

    jumpoff I'm in a camping state of mind

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    Just keep hanging around here Jenn and you'll learn all kinda fun stuff[8D]
     
  14. terry1419

    terry1419 Active Member

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    Try doing a Google search. There are several Utube videos to explain what, why, and how.
     
  15. CampStewart

    CampStewart Member

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    Etrailer has a lot of informative videos, be careful about following advice regarding technical information here, there are a lot of unfounded opinions based on rumors and made up logic. As an example I strongly advise you to do a lot more searching from reputable sources before you decide to inflate your tires to their maximum pressure without regard to their load rating and your trailers weight.
     
  16. jumpoff

    jumpoff I'm in a camping state of mind

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    CampStewart... I'm interested in what your thoughts are. If the tire has a maximum psi what would be wrong with inflating it to that limit ? I thought you were supposed to go to the max if your load was getting near the capacity of the tire.
     
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  17. inthedirt

    inthedirt Active Member

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    I have lost 2 sets of bearings when towing far from home, and it wasn't pretty. I am VERY cautious to check them when refueling, potty breaks, etc. Both bearing failures were on boat trailers. We lost an axle/hub/outer bearings on a new ski boat while driving to our cabin near Yellowstone, about 7hrs from home. Axle dug into the ground, flipped the trailer 3 complete revolutions before the straps broke and tossed the boat into a field and caught on fire. We lost the boat, a week's worth of groceries, half our luggage, and all our watersports related toys (wakeboards, tubes, jackets, etc). Chains kept the trailer attached to the truck, but wasn't usable in any capacity. The rest was a total loss.

    2nd trailer axle was on another boat leaving our cabin and returning to our new home about 2hrs away. Was only about 20mi down the road and I noticed some smoke from the axle. Fearing the worst, I pulled over and confirmed that those bearings were toast, too. Pulled the boat back to the cabin VERY SLOWLY and left it there. Came back a week later with new bearings and grease. Was a half-azz'd repair as the hubs need a total overhaul with races. I've since completed a total rebuild of the hubs, but am concerned that the axle heated up too much. A new axle with hubs isn't much money and is worth the piece of mind, so that is the direction I'm going before any major road trips with the boat beyond our local swimming holes. Will be buying into a houseboat on Lake Powell next year and dragging our ski boat down with us from Montana. A new axle will be under the boat well before that happens!
     
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  18. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

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    I have lost one set of bearings on a boat trailer and it was 100% my fault. I was pressure washing the driveway and decided to wash the one wheel I could get to. I figured the bearings were safe because the Bearing Buddy had a cap on it. I blasted that wheel spotless...lol...About 20 miles on the next trip the bearing blew apart. I had washed the grease out.

    On the other hand, I have a 1976 boat trailer that was built into a utility trailer in 1993. I hand packed the bearings in 1993 and put on Bearing Buddies. I havent taken it apart since. Sometimes the trailer sits for months or maybe even years. Sometimes I use it weekly. I have probably pulled it 15 times this year. Knock on wood those 40+ year old bearings are still good.
     
  19. jumpoff

    jumpoff I'm in a camping state of mind

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    Very interesting post there xxxapache. Maybe we put too much emphasis on this whole bearing thing. I had a salt water boat trailer and my bearing tore apart but to your point I've never had another issue with 5 other trailers. Also I remember what you said on an above post about the tires that were on the sunny side being quite a bit warmer....I found out with my new thermometer that you were 100% right on that....10 degrees warmer.
     
  20. CampStewart

    CampStewart Member

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    The advice given earlier did not say a thing about the tires weight capacity and trailers weight, only to fill it to the max. Filling a tire to a load capacity well beyond what is needed will cause the tire to wear unevenly, reduce its contact patch, and beat the crap out of the trailer and everything inside of it. I have been towing trailers for 5 decades and I am shocked as to how much incorrect information is put out on this forum for others to follow at their own peril.

    You should only go to maximum psi if you are approaching the tires weight limit.
     
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