Kayak hauling?

Discussion in 'Cargo Carriers / Bike Racks / Other Storage Option' started by Boomy, Mar 9, 2017.

  1. Boomy

    Boomy New Member

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    Aug 14, 2014
    Texas
    I kayak fish offshore and both my tow vehicles have racks on them, but I'd like to drop them out of the wind. Looking for ideas of how you guys carry yours?


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  2. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Oct 10, 2013
    Northern Virginia
    I once hauled my kayak on the pup by using the foam blocks and using ratchet straps to strap it down. My problem was I was afraid I was going to tighten things down too much and bend the roof so played things very cautious I also didn't like the placement of the bowline strap. To top it off, the site I went to I had to drive to the dock, so ultimately found myself hooking the kayak back onto the car anyway. I don't dare screw anything on my roof of the pop-up so foam blocks was my only option. It is doable, but for my setup I didn't trust it as much as I do on my car, and found the on/off much more of a bigger pain.
     
  3. eoleson1

    eoleson1 Well-Known Member

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    Jul 5, 2011
    Macomb County Michigan
    We carry ours on the top of the pup using the foam car kits, front straps to the tongue, rear straps to the bumper, and one center strap over both of them hooked to the frame on both sides.
     
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  4. Boomy

    Boomy New Member

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    Aug 14, 2014
    Texas
    We used a bent extra thick pool noodle for my daughters yak this summer...... thinking of mounting a drop in rack in the front and maybe a pad on the roof so only half the weight is on the roof.

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  5. Djo

    Djo Member

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    Feb 3, 2014
    Eyeballing it, your kayak may be too long for using your pup as a trailer to haul it. You want the kayak centered on the pup. You also want at least a foot or 18" of clearance between the front of the kayak and the back of your car. Otherwise you crunch the front of the boat when making a tight turn.
    David
     
  6. Boomy

    Boomy New Member

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    Aug 14, 2014
    Texas
    12' box + 4' tounge
    vs
    14' kayak. ....
    When I trailer it is generally on a 6' trailer......

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  7. Boomy

    Boomy New Member

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    Aug 14, 2014
    Texas
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  8. BelchFire

    BelchFire I speak fluent vise-grip

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    Mar 29, 2012
    SE Georgia
    I have a Yakima rack on my cab as well as a home made Yakima knockoff on the (factory) rails of the p'up. I put two 'yaks on the truck and two 'yaks on the p'up and I secure all the 'yaks to the rails rather than the body of the truck or p'up.
     
  9. dlaudens

    dlaudens Member

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    Dec 21, 2015
    Kentucky
    I used 2 foam blocks with a ratchet strap over the top and bow/stern lines to the pup frame. Looked around at a lot of different roof racks for the pup, but couldn't bring myself to drilling holes in the roof.

    Went on a two week East Coast trip and the ratchet strap never stayed tight and always worked itself loose. I think it is a combination of the slickness of the polyethylene, the curvature of the yak, and the fact it was offset due to my AC unit. Never had any issues or concerns though, since most of the holding power is in the bow/stern lines and the ratchet strap was just a 'safety'.

    My 14' yak was just a bit longer than the pup box so there were no clearance issues with the TV.
     
  10. RFryer

    RFryer Hopkinton, MA

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    Mar 10, 2009
    Hopkinton, MA
    In my experience the kayaks are aerodynamic enough that they don't really affect my gas mileage, unlike my bikes on top of the car.
     
  11. NothingsChocking

    NothingsChocking Active Member

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    Mar 7, 2017
    Texas
    One thing to remember is pop ups have a roof weight limit; so, when you use the noodle or the foam block method, the ratchet strap itself adds "weight" or clamping pressure that far exceeds the initial weight of the kayak. I believe traditional pop-ups are a little bit more forgiving to this, but A-frame hardsiders are even more prone to damage by this method. Perhaps consider a roof rack that spans from top side of roof (frame to frame). Next, strap the kayaks to the rack with straps. Straps create a lot of clamping force so let the racks absorb it. Then, the only force transferred to the unit is the weight of the kayak and rack. Holes are never drilled in the roof proper where water pools. Prorack makes a good fitting rack for mine and several other styles both for traditional and hardside pop-up. A good picture of what these look like can be seen on photos for new Rockwood ESPs (Extreme Sports Package). Mine is not an ESP but they work the same none-the-less.
     
  12. BelchFire

    BelchFire I speak fluent vise-grip

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    Mar 29, 2012
    SE Georgia
    This is exactly why I strap my kayaks directly to a rack rather than strap them to the frame.
     
  13. GeorgiaPopup

    GeorgiaPopup New Member

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    Feb 13, 2017
    This is our method when going to the lake. Hope it helps.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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  14. nhcaveman

    nhcaveman Barrington, NH

    1,235
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    Mar 25, 2009
    New Hampshire

    I have Yakima racks on the truck and do the same when kayaking locally.
    However if traveling any distance I will secure with bow and stern lines to the front and rear bumpers.
    I know several Kayakers who would object to not using the added lines every times as racks can and do break, come free from the vehicle, etc. so they'd be right to do so.
    Currently all my boats are poly boats so I'm not too concerned, if I were to buy another composite boat I'd want to make sure it was properly secured every time.
    Also I remove my Yakima racks for winter as suggested by the Yakima Rep when I bought them. I also grab hold of them and shake the truck back and forth, side to side every time I put a kayak up there to be sure they're secure.


    I have traveled with a kayak on top of the popup with the pool noodle method, but wasn't very comfortable doing so, and likely won't again. There were no issues to speak of, I just don't like the thought of damaging my roof.
     
  15. BelchFire

    BelchFire I speak fluent vise-grip

    1,276
    46
    Mar 29, 2012
    SE Georgia
    I always secure the bow and stern with straps as well, I just don't put a tight load on those lines so I don't 1) put undue stress on the poly kayak (think bending in the So. GA heat) and 2) put undue stress on my roof. I even do this when towing locally. Mostly to prevent porpoising or buffeting in the wind.

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    Last edited: Mar 14, 2017
  16. cyclesteve

    cyclesteve Member

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    Jan 27, 2007
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