Painting my Pop Up? (with picture)

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Repairs & Maintenance' started by NewPupOwner, Jul 27, 2010.

  1. NewPupOwner

    NewPupOwner New Member

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    Hello! I am a brand new pop up owner. This is my very first pop up I have ever owned. I am looking to repaint my 1983 Rockwood pop-up. As you can see in the picture, it could use it. I want to just paint it white, and then add a blue strip. What would be the best way to go about this?

    -What type of paint should I use that would go on well, and stand up against the weather?
    -How do I remove the decals and prep it for the paint?
    -How should I go about adding the blue strip?
    -How should I paint it? (Paint Sprayer, Brush, Roller etc..)
    -I heard about using Scotch-Brite Pads. What does this do?

    I would love to see how some of you painted your pop ups. As I paint it, I will take pictures so you can all see how it is going along. Thanks so much for your help!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. NeedtoRoam

    NeedtoRoam Colorfull Colorado

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    Welcome to the portal from Colorado! I'm sure someone will chime in about your painting project. Glad you found us.
     
  3. MikeInLa

    MikeInLa Don't forget the A/C cover!

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    Welcome and nice pup!

    That old pup has the aluminum/metal skin. I would use ordinary acrillic spray paint. Those old stickers can be a pain to remove... a good heat gun (some have used hair dryers) will help. If that is indeed a metal skin (it looks like it is), scotch-brite pads can be quite helpful in the prep work. For the blue stripe... you have a few options: paint it yourself, or there are some places where you can actually order striping kits (I think someone here posted a link to a site where you can actually get striping kits for pop-ups). If you decide to paint the stripes, just let your white paint dry real good for a day or so, then tape/mask off everything except where you want the stripe and shoot it with acrillic spray paint also. Pick up a few extra cans of whatever colors you use for future touch-ups or as a reference if you ever need to get the same color for some reason.

    If you spray-paint, just be sure to mask off things where you don't want paint... there is always more overspray than you realize while your painting. Can't tell you how many times I've painted something only to come back the next day and see all the overspray!
     
  4. TheSullivans

    TheSullivans New Member

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    We are in the process of painting ours now. We have the base color on, just need to finish the accent color / stripes.
    We used Rustoleum, oil-based enamel from Lowes with a high nap roller. It went on very easy and looks great. It is much simpler than spraying it, because you don't have to worry about over-spray and I was able to do it in my driveway. The color we chose was "Aluminum".
    For the accent color / stripes, we are using an exterior latex paint. Not sure how well that will hold up yet, but that is what was recommended by several people, so going to try it.
    To remove the decals, we used a steamer that is made for taking wrinkles out of clothes. Probably not the easiest way you could do it, but the wife and kids worked on that while I was working on other stuff. Once those were off, we used Scotch-Brite pads to scuff up the old paint and clean up any problem areas, then wiped it down with mineral spirits to get it good and clean.
    I don't have any pictures with me to post, but will add some as soon as I can.

    Brad
     
  5. Need2Travel

    Need2Travel Rhode Island

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    I'm not sure if Sears Weatherbeater Ultra has ever been mentioned or used by anyone here on the Portal - but it is everything they claim. You can paint ANYTHING (wood, metal, plastics) with it - little to no prep work (and zero primer) I needed a paint that I could use to paint an all metal (mixed metals) church sign that had not been painted in over 35 years - It was huge, and it was a mess (ugly, rusted out in areas, etc). - No traditional prep, just brushed off any an lose dirt and debris I could (which is all they recommend to do)

    Also a plus is it can be used in much cooler temps than most, if not all other types of paints - which could be very good news for anyone wanting to paint in their PUP (or anything else) after the camping season.

    It costs about $30 - $35 a gallon - I'd be very surprised if you needed more than one for even the largest of PUPs, a little goes a long way.

    It has been over 5 years since I painted it with the Sears Weatherbeater Ultra it still looks like it did the day I finished painted it.

    I recall my local Sears store having a printed brochure on it that gives much more details than the link I posted that I'm sure you could pick up for more official & scientific information beyond my "it is a miracle" paint claim :)
     
  6. TwistedElvis

    TwistedElvis New Member

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    I can do striping kits if you meed some done send me a pm
     
  7. NewPupOwner

    NewPupOwner New Member

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    Thanks for the help everyone! This will be fun painting our pop up. I was looking into it more, and I think for the blue strip I will just buy pin stripe tape. That should work well. I will also order new custom "Rockwood" decals off the internet. I just hope I will be able to get a good base paint down on it!
     
  8. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    The oil based enamel would be best. Sometimes slow drying so it should be protected as it dries. Don't like the different kind of paint on top of it. You may even have problem with the same paint (enamel) on top of fresh enamel. If you try, do a test first. A local sign shop maybe able to help you with stripes. Good luck
     
  9. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    You can see our paint job here:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/kitphantom/

    We had to patch several areas, so decided we'd have fun with paint. The old decals and striping were pretty well cracked and flaking, I used a paint remover, heat gun, various sanding pads and brushes to urge the remainder off. We didn't care to replace the decals, so just made a decorative strip, approximately where the original one was.

    There's a bit of a wavy look to the edges at the door and metal moldings , I didn't mask it well enough to take care of all the texture from the aluminum skin. The copper is a hammered-look Rustoleum; the green is the same brand. Has worked well, we expected (& got) some flaking over old silicone caulking, since we didn't think all the residue disappeared in spite of lots of elbow grease and remover; there are a couple of other areas over patches that have a few speckles. In general, it looks OK from a distance, and it is pretty well protected.

    I have to repaint the roof, as the first attempt failed due to a combination of factors; there is an old thread about it somewhere.

    We knew it would not look like a new camper, and we're OK with semi-funky, one-of-a-kind.
     
  10. Bullfrog Bheer

    Bullfrog Bheer Active Member

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    First of all, make sure that there's no wax or silicone on the PUP. If there is, you will get what's known as fisheyes in the new paint. You can get a wax remover from an auto parts store that sells auto paint.

    Also make sure that not only the decal is removed, but also the adhesive. Many times the decal will come off, but leave the adhesive. You can use a solvent to get the adhesive off, but test a small area first to make sure it's not removing the paint also. If it does, use something milder like the wax remover.

    Finally to have the new paint stick, you have to have every square inch of that thing scuffed. The Scotchbrite pads will work great for that. Or what works even better is to scrub the whole thing wet with the Scotchbrite pads and Comet or Ajax. That scuffs it and cleans it at the same time. Just make sure it's absolutely clean and dry before you paint.

    Don't leave any cleanser film dried on there and make sure that there are no shiny spots on the old paint (that's an area that didn't get scuffed and new paint wont stick to for long).
    The new paint job is only as good as the prep work and you don't want to do all that work only to have the new paint start to flake off or peel.
     
  11. ballard

    ballard New Member

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    I used oil based enamel thinned with naptha. My body panels and roof skin are all aluminum.

    I spent much time stripping the old paint and decals. In the end it would have saved alot of time if I had used an erasure stripe removing wheel. They sell them at places like autoparts stores. During my sticker removal I was unable to locate this and wouldn't you know it that as soon as I was done I saw one at a small parts store. -they only had one though......in the end I found that a strong chemical paint stripper, scotch brite pad, steel wool, and 200 grit wet sand paper with a rubber sanding block worked good at removing the decals and paint. If you don't want to mess up the original paint (cause you may want to paint on top of it rather than go down to bare metal) then you will need the stripe removing wheel.

    So far I've done all my paint layers with a foam roller and thinned out oil enamel. Thinning the paint up to 25% at times. This helps the paint level out nice an smooth. I have been wet sanding with 200 and 400 grit wet sand paper and rubber sanding block in between coats which helps create a really smooth surface, making each layer and ultimately the final coat nice and smooth.

    I have purchased an hvlp sprayer and plan to spray the finish coats. So far I have done about 4 coats of primer on the roof and body. After the initial primer coat I used bondo to fill in any small dents on the roof but my body panels did not require any filler.

    I have been using the 3m masking tape made for this type of painting. It's a bit different from indoor house paint masking tape. It come in many different flavors so look at all the labels. You don't want something that will stick too much and leave a lot of glue. Some of the tape that I used was unusually difficult to get off without damaging the paint edge left behind.

    I will be painting on some stripes or designs. I am not sure exactly my approach but I will most likely use a masking tape or striping tape for this. I will first get down my final base coat. Then mask off, then lightly sand the area where the stripe will be, then spray the stripe color. I will be using a process where I put several layers of paint down.

    I've done much research on paint but in the end decided on oil enamel since it seemed like the safest option to spray without killing myself. Oil is a nice hard finish (unlike lacquer which is soft and very soluble in solvents). My other option was using marine paint like interlux but again, this wouldn't be safe to spray without a fresh air respirator. I will be using a charcoal 3m respirator when I spray the oil.

    The foam roller does a great job on it's own if you don't want to use an hvlp spray.

    Initially I thinned the oil enamel with quality paint thinner (mineral spirit based) but then read that many prefer thinning with naptha which evaporates very quickly and can slightly increase dry time. I read much about japan dry as a fast drying additive but decided against it after reading concerns about paint jobs cracking later on from drying too fast. Depending on weather temp and humidity I have mostly just thinned my paint by eye and feel but I have read that when I spray with the hvlp gun, I can expect to thin it by as much as 25% naptha in order to go through the gun tip efficiently. This will also create a nice smooth self leveling application of paint.

    I've never painted metal before but my goal was to try and acheive a car like finish. I spent time reading some of the "paint your car in your driveway with rustoleum" stories on the internet. While I am skeptical about that process on a nice car It seems very appropriate for a camper. I recommend you check out those layouts. Google Paint car with rustoleum or something like that and you will see many documentaries of people painting their cars with foam rollers and off the shelf oil based paint.

    I'm using Sherwin W paint and primer. So far I have found the foam roller to be the best and during my process of applying several coats of primer, when the weather was just right and the paint was thinned just right I have had some coats go on a look incredibly close to a sprayed paint job. The key is to roll it out quickly working in small areas at a time and not going back over anything with the roller. The paint will turn sticky and begin setting up pretty quick with the naptha so you want to avoid working the paint with the roller too much. Just roll it on, get it nice as quick as you can and leave it. Fix any crappy areas after it has dryed by sanding a reapplying paint. I have found that trying to remedy something after the paint has tacked to be impossible and only makes things worse.

    We would love it if you would start a thread in the restoration area and post lots of pics. Check out my thread in restoration forum and best of luck.
    ballard
     
  12. Xolthrax

    Xolthrax Franconia, Pa.

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    I used Kilz primer and Valspar Ultra Premium exterior paint. I had it color matched to a can of Rustoleum spray paint (for the inevitable touch-ups later).

    [​IMG]

    I got the striping on eBay and had the decals made at Great Lettering. I even had a decal made for my bumper there:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. NH-popper

    NH-popper Boldly going camping!

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    Joe, that's one fine looking Rockwood. Ours is operationally fine, but it's the ugliest PUP in the campground (I suppose that in itself is a distinction of sorts). I look forward to eventually making it look nicer. the roof especially - it doesn't leak, but it ain't pretty, either (and the quickie gobs of caulk to try to repair the broken corner pieces by the previous owner doesn't help!).
     
  14. ballard

    ballard New Member

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    I have read about this product. I think it might be made by sherwin williams for sears. It definitely would work.

    I think if you are not sure about painting the pup first decide how you want to apply the finish (rattle can spray, hvlp spray, brush, roller). Then once you have decided that then start to consider type of paint starting with a decision on water based or oil/solvent based. The from there start narrowing down your paint.

    If not experienced then stick with one brand and one line of paint for both primer and top coats. Also use the recommended thinners. For example, the rustoleum I looked at needs to be thinned with acetone but that wouldn't work with my SW oil enamel. Don't do something like try and make up your own recipe ie mixing urethane with enamel. Keep it simple.....check out the autoparts stores for paints but be aware of the lacquers sitting on there shelves. Lacquer is soft paint that can not be painted over with different paint without a barrier coat. Lacquer is very soluable to most solvents and is a delicate finish. Stick with items like latex, oil enamel, roll and tip single part marine urethane, rattle can spray, rustoleum products. The duplicolor paints in the auto stores are laquer which is what makes application easy and possible by a DIY person but the finish is not very durable.
     
  15. mrbill

    mrbill Central Coast of California

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    I didn't paint my '86 Jayco ( I did paint the frame), but I did replace the stripes. I used vinyl tape that I got from here: Vinyl Tape. They have many colors and sizes to choose from. I used 4", 3/4 ", and 1/4" in 3 colors. It was easy to do and looks great. I also used the 4" and an Exacto knife to cut the new decals (I traced the old ones first) although I have not taken pictures of that yet.

    Here is the before:
    [​IMG]

    And after:
    [​IMG]
     
  16. dcaptd

    dcaptd Member

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    If you want to strip down to the metal use aresol gasket remover. Works on the paint and strips alike. Some of the bodyshop guys I know would compete to see who could peel off the largest area in one piece. Just have to clean after to make sure no film is left.
     
  17. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    Joe: You forgot the pictures of those cool rims ... The pup doesn't look the same without them.. [:D]
     
  18. Xolthrax

    Xolthrax Franconia, Pa.

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    Thank God! That was one hideously failed experiment. [:(O]

    Mrbill, between the stripe and repainting the wheels, that looks 20 years newer! My friend has an '86 806, I'll have to make sure he sees your pictures.
     
  19. mrbill

    mrbill Central Coast of California

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    Thanks Xolthrax. It took a lot of cleaning too. If you check the pictures in my Dorst 2010 album and go to the one that shows the door side of the PUP and then zoom-in , you can see the Jayco lettering and the bird that I re-did. Now if only I could make myself look 20 years newer!
     
  20. ballard

    ballard New Member

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    My method is painfully slow and still not complete:
    [​IMG]
    the beginning
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    chemical stripper and scotchbrite pad followed by 200 grit wetsanding
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    get an erasure wheel at the auto store to remove stripes or do it the hard way like me and waste several days
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    first prime coat then wet sanding
    [​IMG]
    High build primer coat
    [​IMG]
    wet sanding high build
    [​IMG]
    Then tinted primer coat, more wet sanding, more tinted primer

    Then I moved to painting the roof and have not yet finished. I am almost to the point of final primer coat on the roof.

    [​IMG]
    removed center strip and corner caps, cleaned completely and used chemical stripper with scotchbrite pad.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The roof was dented from a hale storm as well as other things so body filler went on
    [​IMG]
    and more filler, more sanding (dry sanding so body filler wont saturate
    [​IMG]
    In the end I did about three coats of filler over bad damage, sanding inbetween and then skim coated the entire roof and did a final sand down.
    [​IMG]
    then I primed and installed the center strip and corner caps. I had to do this as I had a planned camping trip and did not want to leave anything exposed. After I got back from the trip I did more sanding of the primer coat, some cleanup of the center strip and next I will remove the corner caps, tape off the center strip and apply more primer. I have two weeks until the next trip so I must move to finish coat on the roof and hopefully finish coat the body as well before that trip.
     

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