Roof side panel replacement

Discussion in 'Roof/Floor Repair & Maintenance' started by kk1965, Sep 9, 2008.

  1. kk1965

    kk1965 New Member

    5
    0
    Sep 9, 2008
    Hello all,
    I will need to replace one of my side roof panels on a '94 Flagstaff and need some advise from people with experience.
    The PUP is a 10 ft box so a regular sheet of plywood will not do the job.
    I am looking at 2 options for this panel:
    1. Using 2 layers of 1/4 inch and laminating it while overlapping the joint.
    2. Using 1/2 inch ply and setting up a lap joint.

    Which method would be better?
    If I use the lap joint where should I put the joint - in the middle or at the 7 - 8 foot mark?

    Any help from experience would be appreciated.

    KK
    Tow - '04 Ram HEMI - Overkill but it is fun to drive
    PUP - '94 Flagstaff
     
  2. campers4life

    campers4life New Member

    91
    0
    Sep 5, 2008
    we rebuilt a 92 rockwood xl roof by using 12ft pieces of pine. we got the width we need and scribed exactly what we needed and then it was one solid piece and we got the required bow in the roof. ill c if i can get some pics for you

    Mike * Laura
    * Katelynn *
    Little Falls, NJ
    '92 Coleman Pioneer Arcadia <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">
    '07 Dodge Caliber <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle">
    "It's not about where you've been, it's about where you're going!"
     
  3. jetrail

    jetrail New Member

    221
    0
    Oct 4, 2007
    edgewater , md
    i know some ppl don't like it but you can get a 12 ft board , and get it however wide you needs it and rip it thinner to what you need, but it might be stronger doing it the way you were talking about

    Jay & Lisa
     
  4. Goldens

    Goldens Member

    367
    0
    Sep 6, 2008
    Massachusetts
    My 88 Palomino was originally built with pine, so that's what I replaced mine with. I don't think it matters where you do a lap joint if you go with plywood, but I would keep it near one end like you mentioned. Have a look at my pic's if you want.

    Steve.

    1988 Palomino Colt <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">
    1985 Dodge B250 van <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle">
    1983 15' Indian canoe <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_canoe.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Canoe">
     
  5. kk1965

    kk1965 New Member

    5
    0
    Sep 9, 2008
    My main reason for looking at plywood vs solid pine is stability - I have seen pine warp if not supported properly. And trying to find a piece of pine up here at those dimensions there would be knots and that would also risk stabilty.
    The current panel is particle board - YUCK!!!


    Hello all,
    I will need to replace one of my side roof panels on a '94 Flagstaff and need some advise from people with experience.
    The PUP is a 10 ft box so a regular sheet of plywood will not do the job.
    I am looking at 2 options for this panel:
    1. Using 2 layers of 1/4 inch and laminating it while overlapping the joint.
    2. Using 1/2 inch ply and setting up a lap joint.

    Which method would be better?
    If I use the lap joint where should I put the joint - in the middle or at the 7 - 8 foot mark?

    Any help from experience would be appreciated.

    KK
    Tow - '04 Ram HEMI - Overkill but it is fun to drive
    PUP - '94 Flagstaff
    [/quote]
     
  6. jjmac

    jjmac New Member

    363
    4
    Jul 26, 2008
    I just got finished replacing both side boards on my roof. My roof was 12' 4" long so I had no option other than putting 2 pieces together somehow.

    I went with 1/2" plywood and used a lap joint. Click my camera icon, I took photos all the way through.

    I placed the lap joints in the middle because the stress of the board is actually on the ends near the lift posts, the middle is held more by the screws that tie into the rest of the top frame. I put wooden dowels in the lap joint and aluminum flashing on the outside with contact cement and once all that was together the vertical strength of the board was far beyond what I had hoped for. I have no doubts the sides will hold up longer than the camper itself.

    -------------------
    josh
    99 chevy 1500
    97 rockwood premier

    Edited by - jjmac on September 09 2008 15:04:21
     
    kadovols likes this.
  7. kk1965

    kk1965 New Member

    5
    0
    Sep 9, 2008
    Hey Josh,
    Thanks for the pictures.
    How long did it take you to do this? I was planning on doing it in 1 weekend - reasonable or not?
    What kind of glue did you use to laminate the lap joint?

    KK
     
  8. jjmac

    jjmac New Member

    363
    4
    Jul 26, 2008
    1 weekend would be reasonable if all you had to do was make the wood and install it.

    However I also had to remove the old wood and scrape all the old caulk/whatever off all the hardware. And scrape... and scrape.. and scrape... it took forever to get all the existing hardware to a condition I was happy with to install the new wood but this was partly because the previous owner doused the whole camper in regular household caulk and that stuff was absolutely terrible to remove.

    For the flashing I used regular contact cement, you can see it in the first photo it's in the red and black can. I ended up having to buy a lot more than shown there. That stuff is really neat, you let it sit for half an hour and then you put it on and once it makes contact it's instantly bonded, there is no room for adjustment. If you look at the other album where I replaced the end boards you can see how I used strips of wood to separate the wood from the FRP in order to line it up before dropping it down onto the contact cement.

    -------------------
    josh
    99 chevy 1500
    97 rockwood premier
     
  9. I used the same methods as Josh. I had to lap joint the plywood to get the proper length. I used epoxy for the lap joint. I then laminated aluminized PVC to both sides of the wood using contact cement. The resulting piece was stronger than I would have imagined.

    I was guided in this project by a friend who used to rebuild boats & RV's for a living. I wanted to get a piece of dimensional lumber and plane it down to the right width. He advised me agains this, stating that since the grain in plywood layers are laminated in opposing planes, they are inherently stronger against bending forces than dimensional lumber. After seeing the results, I have no reason to doubt him.


    Joe

    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">'96 Rockwood Signature Series 1280
    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle">'07 Ford Explorer
    <i>Wherever you go, there you are.</i>
     
  10. kmh1596

    kmh1596 Wilbraham, MA

    5,391
    2
    Aug 20, 2007
    Western MA
    For my pup, I too have a 10' box. When transplanting a donor roof onto my 04, I needed to replace the rotted sides. After searching for a while and not finding (or knowing) what the best way was, I went with a 12' piece of pine, as it was long enough and I wouldn't need to do any lap joints, etc.. Worked great, that pup has been out for almost 50 days this summer, and it looks factory as far as I'm concerned! <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Big Smile">

    I too had looked at getting a larger piece of lumber and having it planed down, but I'm no woodworker, don't claim to be. The pup is fixed now, and works perfectly.

    Click on my webshots by clicking the camera icon, and go to PUP rebuild. Good Luck!

    *Kevin*
    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp"> 2004 Rockwood 1940 LTD, <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle"> 96 Cherokee 2dr 5spd, <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_canoe.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Canoe"> ~16' Old Town Canoe
    Nights Booked 08: 53, Camped so far: 46

    Edited by - kmh1596 on September 10 2008 14:20:56
     
  11. SeanPeck

    SeanPeck New Member

    1
    0
    Sep 14, 2008
    I am in the process of replacing on of the roof sideboards on a 99 Flagstaff. Except when we figured out the problem the damage to the particle board was so bad that the exterior sheething was damaged when we started to remove. Did you replace the fiberglass or reuse what you had? I saw in another post a response about asking an rv place for filon, but when I originally went to a local dealer they said the sheet the size I would need cost $500. There must be a cheaper solution.
     
  12. jjmac

    jjmac New Member

    363
    4
    Jul 26, 2008
    I used flashing, paid $12.95 for the roll so yeah there is a cheaper solution just depending on what you need.

    Others have used a coated type of aluminum flashing you can get for around $100.

    -------------------
    josh
    99 chevy 1500
    97 rockwood premier
     
  13. MikeInLa

    MikeInLa Don't forget the A/C cover!

    239
    0
    Jul 28, 2008
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    SeanPeck - I used FRP (Fiberglass Reinforced Panel). I found it at Home Depot in the same area where you find tile-board for the bathtub/shower. It was right at $30 per sheet (you'll only need one sheet). I used DAP contact cement to apply it. It has the same texture as the rest of my pup so it matches nearly perfectly. I painted it an "egg-shell white" which fairly closely matches the rest of the pup also.

    KK1965 - I did things a bit differently from everyone else, I did not make a lap-joint. My pup is also a 10-ft. I pulled off the inside covering from the sideboard and used it as a pattern to cut my first piece 8-ft long. I then set that end to end with my plywood and traced out the other 2-ft section. I butted them together and put a metal plate on the inside part of the sideboard for reinforcement. I used 1/2" plywood. I did not bother recovering the inside because, for the most part, it is not visible once the canvas and draperies are in place. I didn't lap-joint because 1 - I don't have the proper tools to do it correctly and 2 - once together, there is no real stress at that particular position. Where the lift-rods attach to the side boards, I added some extra wood just above the mount, wedged between the mount and the corner of the ceiling (4 1X2's cut about 3" long each). I did this to ensure that the pressure would be equal on the top and side (if this had been done at the factory, it would never have broken, even if the entire side board rotted out, it would still hold up the roof). As mentioned above, I used FRP for the exterior covering - I cut it the same way, and set it so that where the pieces butted together are on the opposite end of where the plywood is butted together. It came out great, I'm extremely happy with the results. I've had the pup raised and lowered probably 10 times since completion (and up for several days at a time), with a big A/C on the roof... it's holding up fine.

    1996 Rockwood Premier
    1994 Chevy Silverado X-Cab (TV)
    2005 Chevy Malibu (Wife's)
    1967 Chevy Dad (Me, Mike)
    1973 Chevy Mom
    1993 Chevy Daughter

    Edited by - MikeInLa on September 14 2008 10:56:51
     
  14. jjmac

    jjmac New Member

    363
    4
    Jul 26, 2008
    I didn't cover the inside of mine with anything either, but I had a reason. In the future if I have a leak of some sort in the side panels again, not only will that allow the wood to breath but it will give me easy access to inspect the problem. I think part of the reason the roofs rot so easily is because they are sealed up on both sides, and people have no heads up there is a problem because they can't see it.

    -------------------
    josh
    99 chevy 1500
    97 rockwood premier
     
  15. Here is an example of the PVC coated flashing that Josh had mentioned. That is what I used. I laminated it both inside and outside for 2 reasons: First, it added strength to the lap joint. Second, it looks good. One roll would be enough to complete 2 roof jobs.


    Joe

    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">'96 Rockwood Signature Series 1280
    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle">'07 Ford Explorer
    <i>Wherever you go, there you are.</i>
     
  16. scoutermom

    scoutermom New Member

    285
    1
    Mar 27, 2007
    Josh, your lap joint looks like the best way to go, and the flashing would work great for the side panels, but I have two questions for you;

    first, if you had to make those lap joints again, what kind of tool would you wish you had to get those two layers of plywood off, since you said the router didn't work so well? I have a full size router, but I don't have a belt sander or planer,(just a palm sander) do you have any suggestions? I've seen lap joints like yours used in buidling wood boats and they are very strong.

    Second, flashing is fairly easy to find in widths that can cover the sidewalls of the roof,even if I didn't get the nice PVC coated stuff you used and painted it. but what would anyone suggest to replace the aluminum of the roof itself? mine is so worn that I think it's full of pinholes, and if I try to get more of the foam off to see, I'd probably put more holes in it, anyway. I'd really like to replace it but can't find a material that is 1; readily available and 2; cheap enough.

    Lastly, I'd looked at those bathroom fiberglas panels as a thought to replace the roof itself, (outside) but am leary about them getting brittle in the sun and not standing up to the UV rays and cold.

    Menards has a product called PlasTex but they warn about NOT using it where it is exposed to the elements, it's for indoor use only.

    So what can someone use to replace or rebuild a roof completely? and have it withstand the weather and sun?

    laura

    1973 Starcraft starmaster 6 - a work in progress - http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/album/558473066XXMupb
     
  17. jjmac

    jjmac New Member

    363
    4
    Jul 26, 2008
    I wouldn't have been able to do the lap joints without the belt sander. The router did a good job at cutting the straight lines and getting the bulk of the wood out, and then a few minutes with the belt sander was all it took to get the rest down to size. not sure what tools would be available in my price range to make that any easier, but it was fairly easy as-is. I don't recall saying the router didn't work so well, but it definitely would not have worked well by itself (not without some sort of guiding track) the belt sander was a necessity.

    I have contemplated what I would replace the roof FRP with if it were ever necessary, and I considered getting the widest flashing available and seaming it together. Many roofs have a center seam already I would think that 3 or 4 strips of flashing would cover it... It could work as long as you took extra care sealing the seams, maybe even some eternabond.

    -------------------
    josh
    99 chevy 1500
    97 rockwood premier

    Edited by - jjmac on September 18 2008 10:11:02
     
  18. Before I rebuilt my side panels, I did a little investigating because I wasn't sure if I'd have to rebuild the whole roof. If I had to, I would have used EPDM. It' perfect for this application.


    Joe

    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">'96 Rockwood Signature Series 1280
    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle">'07 Ford Explorer
    <i>Wherever you go, there you are.</i>
     
  19. jjmac

    jjmac New Member

    363
    4
    Jul 26, 2008
    I had never seen that before, will keep that bookmared for future references!

    -------------------
    josh
    99 chevy 1500
    97 rockwood premier
     
  20. MikeInLa

    MikeInLa Don't forget the A/C cover!

    239
    0
    Jul 28, 2008
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Very interesting Joe, I'm bookmarking that one myself!

    1996 Rockwood Premier
    1994 Chevy Silverado X-Cab (TV)
    2005 Chevy Malibu (Wife's)
    1967 Chevy Dad (Me, Mike)
    1973 Chevy Mom
    1993 Chevy Daughter
     

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