Battery operated power lift

Sep 2, 2014
42
I have a 2010 viking with a VERY rudimentary power lift system that operates off the battery (with no manual backup) and is mounted on the trailer tongue right next to the battery. It appears factory or dealer installed but is much less sophisticated looking than others I've seen.

The motor on the uplift decides to quit periodically on the way up (it never quits on the way down when the motor is less stressed), but if I pause for thirty seconds to let it rest, it operates again. Does anyone have enough experience with this system (or similar) to know whether this is just the way it is, or if it's a premature sign of imminent failure? Battery appears to have a good charge.
 

Greg H

Active Member
Mar 22, 2019
103
Ontario, Canada
This doesn’t answer your question directly, but in my opinion the power lift systems are more trouble than they’re worth. Under-engineered, unreliable and prone to failure. There are endless threads about various failures.

I begrudgingly switched mine to a manual winch (< 1 hour job) after the main gear stripped out, and haven’t looked back. Faster, quieter and takes very little effort to raise. Saves battery power too!

I have a 2010 viking with a VERY rudimentary power lift system that operates off the battery (with no manual backup) and is mounted on the trailer tongue right next to the battery. It appears factory or dealer installed but is much less sophisticated looking than others I've seen.

The motor on the uplift decides to quit periodically on the way up (it never quits on the way down when the motor is less stressed), but if I pause for thirty seconds to let it rest, it operates again. Does anyone have enough experience with this system (or similar) to know whether this is just the way it is, or if it's a premature sign of imminent failure? Battery appears to have a good charge.
 

WrkrBee

Super Active Member
May 23, 2018
6,544
South Carolina
The motor on the uplift decides to quit periodically on the way up (it never quits on the way down when the motor is less stressed), but if I pause for thirty seconds to let it rest, it operates again.
The lift motor may have a self resetting circuit breaker in-line close to the battery. When it trips, it takes a little time to cool off and reset.

When was the lift system lubed last? That will cause a higher current draw.

A winch will find the weakest link in a lift system and show it to you, at the worst possible time.
 
Last edited:

Grandpa Don

Super Active Member
Sep 5, 2018
1,886
Southern California
This doesn’t answer your question directly, but in my opinion the power lift systems are more trouble than they’re worth. Under-engineered, unreliable and prone to failure. There are endless threads about various failures.

I begrudgingly switched mine to a manual winch (< 1 hour job) after the main gear stripped out, and haven’t looked back. Faster, quieter and takes very little effort to raise. Saves battery power too!
I agree with Greg, and did the same thing two years ago. Dump that power winch and convert to manual. Then buy a 1/2 inch drive cordless drill and a socket genie. I'm using the Dewalt 20 volt Max 1/2 inch drive cordless drill. You will never be sorry!
 

Pierre-Luc

Member
Aug 11, 2021
13
Mirabel, QC
I agree with both there. I had a 4500lbs winch that failed : the result was that the front collapsed (see the Goshen lift front springs popped up | PopUpPortal post :)).
The repair guy said that the winch I had wasn't made for PUP since there is no brake and people install this because they sometimes are cheaper than a manual one.
We installed a manual one and I am really happy with it. It sures takes more strength to life the roof but I am way more confident with this then with that battery powered lift/winch.
 

annie mac

New Member
Aug 15, 2021
7
Here to cast a vote for switching out to a manual system! We had a VERY similar problem to you, and ours eventually quit working. Thankfully, when it did, we were somewhere safe and not out in the middle of nowhere. But having a manual override that takes over an hour to lift or lower was not an adequate safety net for me. Save yourself the time and troubleshooting (which we did a LOT of) and call Goshen and get your manual system going. It took us about two hours to change the lift and the cable. We just had our first trip with complete peace of mind that we won’t be fiddling around with batteries and crossing our fingers that things raise/lower properly. And although we don’t have @Grandpa Don ’s drill system yet ;) it took this 100-lb chica only 38 cranks to be in business. It is SO worth it!
 

Grandpa Don

Super Active Member
Sep 5, 2018
1,886
Southern California
Here to cast a vote for switching out to a manual system! We had a VERY similar problem to you, and ours eventually quit working. Thankfully, when it did, we were somewhere safe and not out in the middle of nowhere. But having a manual override that takes over an hour to lift or lower was not an adequate safety net for me. Save yourself the time and troubleshooting (which we did a LOT of) and call Goshen and get your manual system going. It took us about two hours to change the lift and the cable. We just had our first trip with complete peace of mind that we won’t be fiddling around with batteries and crossing our fingers that things raise/lower properly. And although we don’t have @Grandpa Don ’s drill system yet ;) it took this 100-lb chica only 38 cranks to be in business. It is SO worth it!
After I installed the manual winch I was cranking the top up by hand. It did only take about 37 or 38 cranks to the full up position. I could do it, but I had to change arms about half way up. I'm not the strongest person in the campground. But now that I have the cordless drill, it is effortless. I've just got to be sure I hold on tight to that drill. That baby has some torque!

I start it down an inch or two with the hand crank just to get the clutch to release, then go the rest of the way with the drill. When I raise the top I stop with the drill when the top is about 3 inches from the top. Then I go the rest of the way up with the hand crank. That's just to make sure I don't over lift and break something.
 
Sep 4, 2016
82
I have a 2010 viking with a VERY rudimentary power lift system that operates off the battery (with no manual backup) and is mounted on the trailer tongue right next to the battery. It appears factory or dealer installed but is much less sophisticated looking than others I've seen.

The motor on the uplift decides to quit periodically on the way up (it never quits on the way down when the motor is less stressed), but if I pause for thirty seconds to let it rest, it operates again. Does anyone have enough experience with this system (or similar) to know whether this is just the way it is, or if it's a premature sign of imminent failure? Battery appears to have a good charge.
 
Sep 4, 2016
82
There must be a self-resetting circuit breaker in the power supply line. This means to me that your wire to the electric lift is way undersized and this causes the problem. I used some very large wire a neighbor gave me that was likely no 6 or 8 gauge. I would suspect that someone used around 14 or 16 gauge. I would recommend using at least number 10 gauge wiring to deal with the amps required. I would also make sure all power connections are clean and tight. My heavy gauge wire from the power center to the wire coming out of the electric tongue jack is a soldered connection. That was a weak spot that caused me some issues prior to making it a very good connection to get the needed power and voltage to that electric tongue jack.
 




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