Buddy heaters

SteveP

Super Active Member
May 21, 2015
2,647
I would open the roof vent a crack and also open a window, more to reduce condensation than other concerns. You'll loose a little heat that way but the buddy is radiant heat. We've only run the Buddy through the night once but don't have to deal with Minnesota temps.
 

Susan Premo

Super Active Member
Nov 5, 2020
1,039
Minnesota
Tha
I would open the roof vent a crack and also open a window, more to reduce condensation than other concerns. You'll loose a little heat that way but the buddy is radiant heat. We've only run the Buddy through the night once but don't have to deal with Minnesota temps.
Thanks. I figured we should open at least a vent, didn't think of condensation though.
 

Susan Premo

Super Active Member
Nov 5, 2020
1,039
Minnesota
O
We have 2 Mr Buddy heaters. The biggest problem we have with them is keeping them on! The o2 sensor likes to shut them down.
Oh boy. I'm hoping we won't need it, we're getting our controller worked on, actually replaced, it kept burning out the batteries, went through ours, so bought a new one, happened again, bought another, same thing, so we were lucky they let us buy another, so now we know it's the controller, now we should be able to use the furnace.
 

Jkoht

Active Member
Aug 10, 2020
168
Being from Minnesota and an outdoorsman I've used my buddy Hester in enclosed spaces like a camper, and ice houses. It's the only heater I trust my life to. That said, burning propane does release water vapor that can condense on your ceiling and walls without proper ventilation. As far as carbon monoxide, it does have a low oxygen cutoff sensor, and tipover sensor. I've never experienced ant carbon monoxide issues with mine, and I run a CO alarm along with it. I've had CO poisoning from a poorly built propane heater before and know what it feels like.
 

Sjm9911

Super Active Member
May 31, 2018
12,452
Nj
Yes, it does, and the low O2 sensor shutting off the gas flow is a sign that its not getting enough make up air. The co dispaces the 02 shutting off the unit. A co detector is a 2nd safeguard, in case the sensor fails. Better to be safe then dead.
 

nitrohorse

Active Member
May 27, 2015
215
NE Pennsylvania
I have spent many nights in the PUP with the Buddy heater. The Buddy Heater website recommends 9 sq in of ventilation when in operation, which is 3"x3". I usually just cracked my roof vent and that was sufficient to control the condensation and provide air. Also, my PUP was no where near airtight. I think the gaps along the door probably provide more than enough ventilation by itself.
 

davido

Super Active Member
Jul 17, 2014
1,407
You should have a CO detector in good working order. The heater itself has a low-oxygen sensor and will shut off if too much oxygen is displaced. But the CO detector is extra peace of mind to prevent resting in peace.

Crack a window and possibly roof-top vent. Popup campers have enough air-gaps that even without cracking a window you ought to be fine, but play it safe.

Buddy heaters produce water vapor as their combustion exhaust. They are designed to be safe (when in good working order) to use indoors with adequate ventilation to replace the oxygen that is consumed in the catalytic reaction.

I've used a Mr Buddy heater overnight on several occasions. I prefer the furnace because I know that the combustion air and exhaust are drawn from and vented to the outside. However, built-in furnaces have moving parts and electronics that can fail. The times I've used a Mr Buddy have been when the built-in furnace has failed for some reason (I think both times it was a sail switch).

You will probably want to get a long propane hose and connect your Buddy heater to an external propane tank, kept outside. You should use an inline filter if you do take this approach. A 20 pound propane tank will last a few days, whereas a 1 pound screw-in canister will only last a few hours. When I use mine, I attach it to one of my two front-mounted 20 pound tanks. A 12 foot hose has been sufficient.

These also have tip-over protection. But be really careful not to let bedding or laundry fall anywhere near the heater.

As a bonus, I've used my Mr Buddy to keep part of my house livable when my home furnace went out during the middle of winter a few years ago. 9kbtu isn't much, but it's enough to keep the main living area survivable while waiting for the furnace repair guy to come. I also use it in the garage in the winter time if I'm doing work out in the shop area.
 

Arlyn Aronson

Super Active Member
Jun 11, 2014
2,132
Houghton, MI
Our camper had low and high windows installed just for the heater ventilation and of course we keep them a tad open for heater operations. The Buddy heater has a thermostat which we keep as low as possible, that is just above the pilot setting.
 

Hilldweller

Super Active Member
Mar 2, 2021
1,057
Hog Waller, GA
This was our Conqueror trailer:


Big tent on a box, used heavily in the Angolan civil war. Camping is more fun though.
I relocated the 10 lb propane tanks to the rear, ran a 5' hose into the annex room of the tent, put the Little Buddy Heater on an aluminum table down there. It would generally run for a full week all night long. As previously stated, a filter was used in-line.
15 degrees outside, 40 degrees at the base of the tent, 72 degrees up where we slept (with the two little triangle windows cracked open).
Chimney effect worked great.
 




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