No Camping In The Left Lane

Dave2514g

Active Member
Sep 2, 2019
291
Ontario, Canada
Same story here in Ontario Canada. One of my biggest pet peeves when on the roadway. I've noticed in a lot of dashcam videos from Europe that people seem a lot more diligent to adhering to this rule. Wish they'd do more traffic stops here to lessen this issue.
 

Lug_Nut

Active Member
May 29, 2016
353
Mt. Wachusett area, MA
I've noticed in a lot of dashcam videos from Europe that people seem a lot more diligent to adhering to this rule.
Did you also note that those adherents have UK plates?

What if there are more than two lanes in that same direction? What about driving, not actively passing, in the middle lane? That's a bigger problem.
Slow drivers in the right, fast drivers in the left, and many half-fast drivers loitering in the middle lane.
 

Dave2514g

Active Member
Sep 2, 2019
291
Ontario, Canada
Did you also note that those adherents have UK plates?
Nope. Deutschland....
Was thinking specifically of the autobahn. I enjoy watching top speed runs of cars and generally think about how that roadway only works out because people there seem extremely aware of their surroundings and diligently make way when someone is approaching.
 

Lug_Nut

Active Member
May 29, 2016
353
Mt. Wachusett area, MA
Did you also note that those adherents have UK plates?
Nope. Deutschland....
Sorry, my attempt at poking ridicule at those that drive on the wrong side of the road got lost.
The biggest difference is the training needed to earn the privilege of a driving license in western Europe versus the perceived birth-right to text and chomp down a burger while behind the wheel in the USA.
 

Econ

Super Active Member
Aug 18, 2019
1,649
Deep South
I drive in the far right lane and do 5 or so MPH below the speed limit. On the 6 lane it is faster. They're all backed up behind the two slow vehicles parked in the left and middle lane and their ego wont let them in the right lane. this has been a problem since I have been driving.
 

jmkay1

2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah
Oct 10, 2013
7,989
Northern Virginia
For me, I park myself in the middle or far right lanes however because where I live has lots of traffic if I know I have to mege left somewhere in the next 5-10 miles as soon as I'm able I stay in the left lane until I merge and I don't dare leave it. Too many times I've been unable to merge due to traffic so I've learned in order to get anywhere you have to do things way in advance or your screwed. Sadly even outside my city I will still do that if I'm towing. Hard enough to tow in unknown areas worse if you are unable to turn/merge and you find yourself having to find your way back safely on unknown roads. Gotten myself in many tricky situations as it is trying to backtrack with the camper so I want to avoid it if I can.
 

jmkay1

2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah
Oct 10, 2013
7,989
Northern Virginia
This and people who don't know how to merge onto the the highway have always been my pet peeves
Where I live my pet peeve is aggressive drivers. Drivers that act as if they own the entire road and all cars in front of them deserve to be run off the road for daring to get in their way. Or the break checkers for again daring to get in their way. Sadly cops are never around to get them and if the person was to hit my front bumper or if I was unable to stop in time I will automatically be guilty just because of how it works in my state. Unless I have physical proof. Yep, getting to the point a dash cam may be required here.
 

Jimbow

Super Active Member
Silver Supporting Member
Nov 30, 2012
2,149
This and people who don't know how to merge onto the the highway have always been my pet peeves
I lived for a long time on the border. I found it interesting that in Mexico, when merging, you would slow down or stop if there wasn't room. On the US side, drivers would be accelerating. Both systems work but when you mix them accidents happen.
 

Lug_Nut

Active Member
May 29, 2016
353
Mt. Wachusett area, MA
Another 'system' difference to remember when driving in E.U.M. vs. U.S.A. is the use of high beam flash to signal intent.
North of the Rio Grande a flash of the headlights from the other driver is an invitation that I may proceed.
South of el Rio Bravo a similar headlight flash is a warning that they are coming through and I better get out of the way.
 

Grandpa Don

Super Active Member
Sep 5, 2018
1,922
Southern California
I was aware of this regulation here in California and will drive in the right lane most of the time. But there are some stretches of road here are are well worn from heavy truck traffic. There are lots of small pot holes and rough road areas. Particularly on highway 58 East of Bakersfield. Staying in the right lane will beat you and your car up. If there is no traffic behind me, I will ride in the left lane for quite a distance. However, if a vehicle comes up behind me, I will always pull over to let them pass. Then I will go back over into the left lane.

Also, on some of our mountain roads with two lanes going in each direction, I will ride in the left lane there as well. The reason I do that, is because there are some bends in the road that you can not see what is around them. Rocks could fall, and often do, from the high banks on the right side of the road. Or debris could be in the road. By being in the left lane and reducing my speed a little, I have room to maneuver to avoid any possible danger. I will move over for traffic.

Red Rock Canyon on highway 14 is particularly dangerous if you don't pay attention. I once came around one of those sharp bends in the road at the posted speed limit of 65 mph, only to come headlight to headlights with a car that had spun out in the turn. That could have ended badly if I was not paying attention.
 




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