Solo Stove Campfire

Sneezer

Super Active Member
Aug 8, 2015
3,076
DFW, TX
I am not a huge campfire person. Half the time therre is a burn ban anyway, the smoke always seems to follow me, I can’t stand smelling like smoke, I dislike cooking over a fire and most of the time there is little wood around so I would have to either bring it or buy whatever they have at the office or in town.

I do, however, dabble with small wood stoves that mostly use twigs in order to boil a couple cups of water for a backpacking meal or some tea. My favorite of these lightwieght ones is a Toaks titanium wood stove that is a gasifier, so it burns up most of the smoke. I was pretty impressed with it and naturally found the large fire pits that Solo Stove makes (along with a bunch of cheaper clones) but they took up more room than my propane firepit, and were way more money than I could ever justify spending on one. A buddy did buy one of the larger ones though, and I saw it in use at a scout campout. While it was neat, it was big, and went through a ton of wood. You also couldn’t see the flames as much due to the size once the wood started burning down, and it was still a little smoky I thought.

Didn’t bother looking any further into it but I happened to find this little gem at an REI on clearance for $70. I had a little bit of dividend left which brought it down to $50, so I figured I would give it a try. The Campfire is the largest stove model they sell before you get into the big firepits, but it also works quite nicely as a small campfire. Since I mainly solo camp these days this seemed to fit the bill.

I had a chance to finally try it out this weekend. Packed it with some dry wood from some fallen branches, handful of dry leaves on top and a couple stabs with a lighter and that sucker lit right up. Within a couple minutes I had a rather nice little fire going. Plenty big enough for me, generated decent heat if you got close enough, and virtually no smoke once it got going. I found it easy to feed but you do have to process some branches to have a supply. I can almost always find branches on the ground when I camp - it is the bigger pieces that are harder to find. It does burn hot and fast though, but it was pretty easy to keep going.

I ran it for about an hour while I piddled around in the yard, let it go down to hot embers, and tossed some fresh wood back in and it lit right back up. Flames were almost always visible too, and when I was done I let it burn itself out. Nothing but ash remained.

This little guy has found a permanent place in my camping gear. While I could cook with it I plan to primarily use it as a portable solo firepit, and won’t mind having a fire at camp anymore. My little Toaks will even nest in it as well, which was an unexpected plus.

Solo Stove Campfire
 

jmkay1

2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah
Oct 10, 2013
7,869
Northern Virginia
That is cute and even better doesn’t take as much room As the propane fire pits. Are you allowed to use that during a burn ban? I’m thinking not, especially where not even charcoal is allowed. It’s cute though and way less work involved than a regular fire pit.
 

Sneezer

Super Active Member
Aug 8, 2015
3,076
DFW, TX
Pretty sure a burn ban would not allow use of it as well. Most of the ones I have seen prohibited any uncontrolled open flame. If it didn't have an off knob you couldn't use it. The propane fire pit usually complies when I have been in a burn ban situation.
 

TSS

Member
Jan 17, 2022
61
NW Georgia
I am not a huge campfire person. Half the time therre is a burn ban anyway, the smoke always seems to follow me, I can’t stand smelling like smoke, I dislike cooking over a fire and most of the time there is little wood around so I would have to either bring it or buy whatever they have at the office or in town.

I do, however, dabble with small wood stoves that mostly use twigs in order to boil a couple cups of water for a backpacking meal or some tea. My favorite of these lightwieght ones is a Toaks titanium wood stove that is a gasifier, so it burns up most of the smoke. I was pretty impressed with it and naturally found the large fire pits that Solo Stove makes (along with a bunch of cheaper clones) but they took up more room than my propane firepit, and were way more money than I could ever justify spending on one. A buddy did buy one of the larger ones though, and I saw it in use at a scout campout. While it was neat, it was big, and went through a ton of wood. You also couldn’t see the flames as much due to the size once the wood started burning down, and it was still a little smoky I thought.

Didn’t bother looking any further into it but I happened to find this little gem at an REI on clearance for $70. I had a little bit of dividend left which brought it down to $50, so I figured I would give it a try. The Campfire is the largest stove model they sell before you get into the big firepits, but it also works quite nicely as a small campfire. Since I mainly solo camp these days this seemed to fit the bill.

I had a chance to finally try it out this weekend. Packed it with some dry wood from some fallen branches, handful of dry leaves on top and a couple stabs with a lighter and that sucker lit right up. Within a couple minutes I had a rather nice little fire going. Plenty big enough for me, generated decent heat if you got close enough, and virtually no smoke once it got going. I found it easy to feed but you do have to process some branches to have a supply. I can almost always find branches on the ground when I camp - it is the bigger pieces that are harder to find. It does burn hot and fast though, but it was pretty easy to keep going.

I ran it for about an hour while I piddled around in the yard, let it go down to hot embers, and tossed some fresh wood back in and it lit right back up. Flames were almost always visible too, and when I was done I let it burn itself out. Nothing but ash remained.

This little guy has found a permanent place in my camping gear. While I could cook with it I plan to primarily use it as a portable solo firepit, and won’t mind having a fire at camp anymore. My little Toaks will even nest in it as well, which was an unexpected plus.

Solo Stove Campfire
Have a solo stove too and love it!!! Damn impressive.
 

Terry Poole

New Member
Jun 6, 2019
1
That is cute and even better doesn’t take as much room As the propane fire pits. Are you allowed to use that during a burn ban? I’m thinking not, especially where not even charcoal is allowed. It’s cute though and way less work involved than a regular fire pit.
 

OR_scott

Member
Mar 20, 2021
19
I am not a huge campfire person. Half the time therre is a burn ban anyway, the smoke always seems to follow me, I can’t stand smelling like smoke, I dislike cooking over a fire and most of the time there is little wood around so I would have to either bring it or buy whatever they have at the office or in town.

I do, however, dabble with small wood stoves that mostly use twigs in order to boil a couple cups of water for a backpacking meal or some tea. My favorite of these lightwieght ones is a Toaks titanium wood stove that is a gasifier, so it burns up most of the smoke. I was pretty impressed with it and naturally found the large fire pits that Solo Stove makes (along with a bunch of cheaper clones) but they took up more room than my propane firepit, and were way more money than I could ever justify spending on one. A buddy did buy one of the larger ones though, and I saw it in use at a scout campout. While it was neat, it was big, and went through a ton of wood. You also couldn’t see the flames as much due to the size once the wood started burning down, and it was still a little smoky I thought.

Didn’t bother looking any further into it but I happened to find this little gem at an REI on clearance for $70. I had a little bit of dividend left which brought it down to $50, so I figured I would give it a try. The Campfire is the largest stove model they sell before you get into the big firepits, but it also works quite nicely as a small campfire. Since I mainly solo camp these days this seemed to fit the bill.

I had a chance to finally try it out this weekend. Packed it with some dry wood from some fallen branches, handful of dry leaves on top and a couple stabs with a lighter and that sucker lit right up. Within a couple minutes I had a rather nice little fire going. Plenty big enough for me, generated decent heat if you got close enough, and virtually no smoke once it got going. I found it easy to feed but you do have to process some branches to have a supply. I can almost always find branches on the ground when I camp - it is the bigger pieces that are harder to find. It does burn hot and fast though, but it was pretty easy to keep going.

I ran it for about an hour while I piddled around in the yard, let it go down to hot embers, and tossed some fresh wood back in and it lit right back up. Flames were almost always visible too, and when I was done I let it burn itself out. Nothing but ash remained.

This little guy has found a permanent place in my camping gear. While I could cook with it I plan to primarily use it as a portable solo firepit, and won’t mind having a fire at camp anymore. My little Toaks will even nest in it as well, which was an unexpected plus.

Solo Stove Campfire
I’ve had one of the small solo stoves for a several years and 2 summers ago bought a bigger patio unit with grill attachments. I love how they burn.
 

TSS

Member
Jan 17, 2022
61
NW Georgia
I am not a huge campfire person. Half the time therre is a burn ban anyway, the smoke always seems to follow me, I can’t stand smelling like smoke, I dislike cooking over a fire and most of the time there is little wood around so I would have to either bring it or buy whatever they have at the office or in town.

I do, however, dabble with small wood stoves that mostly use twigs in order to boil a couple cups of water for a backpacking meal or some tea. My favorite of these lightwieght ones is a Toaks titanium wood stove that is a gasifier, so it burns up most of the smoke. I was pretty impressed with it and naturally found the large fire pits that Solo Stove makes (along with a bunch of cheaper clones) but they took up more room than my propane firepit, and were way more money than I could ever justify spending on one. A buddy did buy one of the larger ones though, and I saw it in use at a scout campout. While it was neat, it was big, and went through a ton of wood. You also couldn’t see the flames as much due to the size once the wood started burning down, and it was still a little smoky I thought.

Didn’t bother looking any further into it but I happened to find this little gem at an REI on clearance for $70. I had a little bit of dividend left which brought it down to $50, so I figured I would give it a try. The Campfire is the largest stove model they sell before you get into the big firepits, but it also works quite nicely as a small campfire. Since I mainly solo camp these days this seemed to fit the bill.

I had a chance to finally try it out this weekend. Packed it with some dry wood from some fallen branches, handful of dry leaves on top and a couple stabs with a lighter and that sucker lit right up. Within a couple minutes I had a rather nice little fire going. Plenty big enough for me, generated decent heat if you got close enough, and virtually no smoke once it got going. I found it easy to feed but you do have to process some branches to have a supply. I can almost always find branches on the ground when I camp - it is the bigger pieces that are harder to find. It does burn hot and fast though, but it was pretty easy to keep going.

I ran it for about an hour while I piddled around in the yard, let it go down to hot embers, and tossed some fresh wood back in and it lit right back up. Flames were almost always visible too, and when I was done I let it burn itself out. Nothing but ash remained.

This little guy has found a permanent place in my camping gear. While I could cook with it I plan to primarily use it as a portable solo firepit, and won’t mind having a fire at camp anymore. My little Toaks will even nest in it as well, which was an unexpected plus.

Solo Stove Campfire
Most button bans I experienced in GA and SE have not precluded contained campfires. Depends on your local ban. We the solo at home too. GA has burn ban until October with no problems..yet.
 

tfischer

A bad day camping beats a good day at the office
I remember when that first came out... I thought it was silly they called such a tiny thing a "campfire". Now they have much bigger units, and everyone who ones them seems to think they are the greatest thing ever. Someday maybe I"ll cough up the money for one of the larger units (for backyard use,not camping)
 

TSS

Member
Jan 17, 2022
61
NW Georgia
G
I remember when that first came out... I thought it was silly they called such a tiny thing a "campfire". Now they have much bigger units, and everyone who ones them seems to think they are the greatest thing ever. Someday maybe I"ll cough up the money for one of the larger units (for backyard use,not camping)
o direct to solo stove website. Routine sales. We saved over 75 from ACOE.
 

tfischer

A bad day camping beats a good day at the office
G

o direct to solo stove website. Routine sales. We saved over 75 from ACOE.

They're very expensive no matter where you buy them. I think the Yukon (which I would love for our yard) is pushing $500, and then you need a cover, etc. to keep it good.

They were a kickstarter thing when they first came out, and I wrote it off as yet another overpriced Milennial-produced gimmick. But they seem to work well and like I said everyone I know that has used one says they're the best things ever.
 
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TSS

Member
Jan 17, 2022
61
NW Georgia
They're very expensive no matter where you buy them. I think the Yukon (which I would love for our yard) is pushing $500, and then you need a cover, etc. to keep it good.

They were a kickstarter thing when they first came out, and I wrote it off as yet another overpriced Milennial-produced gimmick. But they seem to work well and like I said everyone I know that has used one says they're the best things ever.
Covers on Amazon! Very reasonable.
 

Sneezer

Super Active Member
Aug 8, 2015
3,076
DFW, TX
They're very expensive no matter where you buy them. I think the Yukon (which I would love for our yard) is pushing $500, and then you need a cover, etc. to keep it good.

They were a kickstarter thing when they first came out, and I wrote it off as yet another overpriced Milennial-produced gimmick. But they seem to work well and like I said everyone I know that has used one says they're the best things ever.

Costco and Aldi both had knockoffs this year of the big one, I think the Bonfire? I saw the Ranger and the one up from that at an REI for $160/$175 I think. Was on clearance too and no longer on the website. Still not worth it for me given my use model, but might be good for some.

I heard Aldi cleared their model out as low as $60 in the summer but I was never able to find any that low. I did see a couple for $100 and was tempted, but in the end I passed.
 

Bowman3d

Super Active Member
Apr 13, 2015
1,033
LaLa land (SoCal)
I've been thinking on getting a Solo Yukon for home on the patio so my wife can enjoy a smokeless fire. For camping I use either a propane fire pit or if we feel like a wood fire I have a biolite fire pit. advantages mesh sides so you can see the fire, disadvantages need to keep battery charged for fan and you burn wood fast. But no smoke. If I was still into back packing I'd probably have a small Solo stove. I'm glad you found a way to enjoy a fire that works for you.
 
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